There are currently 18 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Greece. Of these, 16 are inscribed based on “cultural” criteria, while the remaining two (Mount Athos, Meteora) are inscribed for meeting both “cultural” and “natural” criteria. Five of the sites are located on islands, one is distributed between the islands and the mainland, with the remaining 12 exclusively on the mainland.

This first site to be inscribed was the Temple of Apollo at Bassae in 1986, and the most recent are the Philippi, inscribed in 2016. There are an additional 14 sites on the Tentative List.

Acropolis, Athens

The Acropolis

A collection of massive, yet perfectly balanced architectural masterpieces in harmony with the natural landscape, the Acropolis of Athens is one of the most important expressions of Classical Greek aesthetics. It was completed by the 5th century BC and has since then exerted a profound influence on architecture worldwide.

The Acropolis

Archaeological Site of Aigai (modern name Vergina)

Ancient Macedonian tomb of king Philip the second found at Vergina (Aigai) in Greece
Ancient Macedonian tomb of king Philip the second found at Vergina (Aigai) in Greece

The ancient city of Aigai was the first capital of the Kingdom of Macedon. In addition to the monumental palace, lavishly decorated with mosaics and painted stuccoes, the site contains a burial ground with more than 300 tumuli, one of which has been identified as that of Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great.

Archeological site of Delphi

Delphi
Delphi

The pan-Hellenic sanctuary of Delphi, location of the oracle of Apollo, was the spiritual center of the Greek world. Situated in a spectacular natural setting at the foot of Mount Parnassus, it was a symbol of Greek cultural unity from the 8th century BC onwards.